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High School Rules, Mechanics and more

Suggested Plate Conference (encourage all umpires to print this out)

ARE ALL PLAYERS PROPERLY EQUIPPED?

PLEASE REMEMBER SPORTSMANSHIP IS HUGE FOR ALL PLAYERS, COACHES, PARENTS, FANS BEFORE, DURING AND AFTER THE GAME. COACHES ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR ALL.

COACHES MUST ASK FOR AND HAVE TIME GRANTED BEFORE COMING INTO LIVE BALL TERRITORY. IF A COACH HAS A QUESTION, AFTER BEING GRANTED TIME, YOU MUST GO TO THE UMPIRE WHO MADE THE CALL TO DISCUSS. IF THE SITUATION REQUIRES THAT UMPIRE TO GET HELP FROM HIS PARTNER, THE UMPS WILL DISCUSS TOGETHER AND RENDER A FINAL DECISION AND EXPLANATION IF NECESSARY. NO FURTHER DISCUSSION AFTER THIS CAN BE HAD. ANY QUESTIONS? LET'S HAVE SOME FUN AND A GREAT GAME! GOOD LUCK COACHES    


Adam Beck, a AAA MLB Umpire, he returns and gives back to the game he loves. He talks through 2 Man umpire movement in different situations in a casual setting and gives insights on when/how/why to do things a certain way.

ATTRIBUTES OF GREAT UMPIRES

The relentless pursuit of perfection can be applied to five skill areas if an individual is determined to achieve distinction as an umpire.


1. Rules Knowledge

  1. An intimate knowledge and understanding of the rules and their accurate and clear implementation.
  2. You're strong in some areas of the rules, not so strong in other areas, it's a fact of life with each of us. Pick those rules where you are weakest and learn them cold. Remember learning the rules and gaining a thorough understanding takes patience and time.
  3. Adopt a working knowledge of the rules in terms of advantage\disadvantage. Understand the intent of a rule not just the ability to recite it word for word.
  4. Avoid third world calls, they make you look like an amateur.

2. Timing and Judgment ( This means continuous refinement )

  1. Make a conscious effort to slow down, make this a part of your pre-game check off list.
  2. Read, pause, react - allow plays to develop and come to a end before making your decision.

3. Mechanics

  1. Are all about your behavior and your willingness to put forth a focused, continuous, effort for the entire game.
  2. Be crisp in all of your actions.
  3. Hustle all the time. This always overlooked behavior on the part of umpires creates respect from all and keeps coaches in the dugout on close calls.
  4. Hit your spots on the field (positioning) with accuracy, know where you are supposed to be and where your partner is supposed to be. Learn to make immediate adjustments when your partner is out of position. You can talk about what should have been done when you and your partner do a post-game review.

4. Game Management

  1. It's your game to run.
  2. You are the final authority on the field, this means you have a duty to remain calm and in control at all times.
  3. Learn to be professional and approachable but not fraternizing.
  4. Raise the level of awareness in your game. Defuse potential situations before they have a chance to develop.

5. Appearance

  1. Dress impeccably as an umpire, it speaks volumes about how you accept your professional duties.
  2. If you look rumpled you will be treated with disrespect, you single handedly compromise your own authority. Fact: The higher the level of play the more profound this becomes. You earn respect by dressing the part. Remember more than 50% of how you are judged by on-field personnel centers on your appearance. 

EJECTION STANDARDS

Good roadmap to keep ejections to a minimum and only when totally justified

 

If you ever wanted to know what constitutes grounds for ejection, The Umpire School and PBUC have an excellent standards document implemented at the minor league level. The list of 10 reasons below provides uniformity and principles (i.e. a warning first - in most cases) where it is a good call to consider when removal of a player, coach or manager from a game could be warranted.

This document can serve as a foundation and teaching tool for ejections for your league or association, regardless of level.

Reprinted with permission from The Umpire School and PBUC (Professional Baseball Umpires Corp)

Umpires are entrusted with the authority to remove any participant from the game. This responsibility should never be taken lightly.

Minor League Baseball recognizes that every situation is unique and that umpire discretion is essential to proper rule enforcement. While there are unique and extraordinary circumstances, players and clubs look for uniformity in applying consistent standards for ejection.

The following general principles should be considered when deciding whether to eject a player, coach, manager or other person from the game:

  1. Use of profanity specifically directed at an umpire or vulgar personal insults of an umpire are grounds for ejection.
     
  2. Physical contact with an umpire is grounds for ejection.
     
  3. Refusal to stop arguing, and further delaying the game after the umpire has provided a player or manager adequate opportunity to make a point, is grounds for ejection. The umpire should warn the player or manager that he has been heard and that he should return to his position or be ejected.
     
  4. If a player, coach or manager leaves his position to argue balls and strikes (including half swings), he should be warned to immediately return or he will be automatically ejected.
     
  5. During an argument if a manager, coach or player makes reference to having observed a video replay that purportedly contradicts the call under dispute, such person should be warned immediately to stop or he will be subject to ejection from the game.
     
  6. Use of histrionic gestures (i.e., jumping up and down, violently waving arms or demonstrations) while arguing with an umpire, or stepping out of the dugout and making gestures toward an umpire, are grounds for ejection. Throwing anything out of a dugout (towels, cups, equipment, etc.) is grounds for automatic ejection.
     
  7. Actions by team personnel specifically intended to ridicule an umpire are grounds for ejection (i.e. drawing a line in the dirt to demonstrate location of a pitch).
     
  8. Throwing equipment in disgust over an umpire’s call may be grounds for ejection. If the umpire deems the action severe, the umpire may eject the offender. If league regulations permit, the umpire may instead warn the offender by issuing an equipment violation. If issued, the offender is to be notified immediately.
     
  9. Any player, manager or coach who fails to comply with an order from an umpire to do or refrain from doing anything that affects administering the rules and regulations governing play is subject to ejection. Examples of this include failure to stay within the lines of the batter’s box after warning from the umpire, refusal to submit a piece of equipment for the umpire’s inspection, etc.
     
  10. Team personnel may not come onto the playing surface to argue or dispute a warning. If a manager, coach or player leaves the dugout or his position to dispute a warning, he should be warned to stop. If he continues, he is subject to ejection. 

While standards listed here may justify an ejection, it is up to umpire discretion to eject any participant “for objecting to decisions or for unsportsmanlike conduct or language.”
 

In addition, there are situations that result in immediate ejection. These situations include violations such as pitcher possessing a foreign substance, batter charging the pitcher with the intention of fighting the pitcher, pitcher intentionally throwing at a batter, etc.